An evening prayer

Early last month I spent a week on the far north coast of England. With a distant view of the cold North Sea, I stayed at Nether Springs, the Mother House of the Northumbria Community. It’s here a small group of men and women live, work and pray according to the daily rhythms of a semi-monastic way of life. Their gifts of hospitality and welcome are extraordinary.

The time to be still was a gift. Time to write and read was restorative. And the daily disciplines of prayer provided a structure: morning prayers, midday prayers, evening prayers and the gentleness of compline to end the day. And all contained in a simple daily office. My introverted self was in heaven!

Included in the office are various ‘declarations’ of faith. These were especially helpful. They are not detailed credal statements, more affirmations — words through which I could name what I hold onto in faith and what holds me.

This evening prayer I have found especially helpful and have returned to it routinely since returning home.

Lord, you have always given
bread for the coming day;
and though I am poor,
today I believe.

Lord, you have always given
strength for the coming day;
and though I am weak,
today I believe.

Lord, you have always given
peace for the coming day;
and though I am of anxious heart,
today I believe.

Lord, you have always kept
me safe in trials;
and now, tired as I am,
today I believe.

Lord, you have always marked
the road for the coming day;
and though it may be hidden,
today I believe.

Lord, you have always lightened
this darkness of mine;
and though the night is here,
today I believe.

Lord, you have always spoken
when time was ripe;
and though you be silent now,
today I believe.

DSCN2698-200x300The Northumbrian Office, Northumbria Community Trust

6 Comments

  1. Thankyou for sharing this Simon. It’s wonderful – so simple yet so comprehensive! With due respect, I may borrow it for my own evening reflections.
    Peace,
    Rae

    Reply

      1. Liturgy, creeds (oops, “affirmations of faith”), retreats, daily office, compline even? You are definitely more Angli- than Bapti- … Once you’ve embraced robes and infant baptism you will be able to drop the baptist charade altogether 😉

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